Easy “life changing” tips to quotate

First of all you want the reader to be interested in your text, don’t you? A big part of using quotation marks is to implement the quotations into your own sentences!
So now you´re asking yourself: “How do I use those weird quotation marks?”
In order to use them, you have to learn some rules…

Your opinion with a quotation backing it up:

Example:
And because Danny says “I´m not gonna fall!”, it turns out that he is too self-confident (p.3, l. 5-6).
In this example the own material is clearly in the foreground… Which is actually unavoidable if you want to quotate in the most interesting way. If you want to be more transparent with your quotations, you should always refer to the text by adding page and the line number.
You can practice this as in the example above. But it can end in a mess, when you refer to more than one line.
The worst case could look like this: 
And because Danny says “I´m not gonna fall!”, it turns out that he is “too self-confident” (p.3, l. 5-6), (p. 5, l. 21).

The best possiblity to “dodge that bullet”, is to do as the following example:

And because Danny says “I´m not gonna fall!” (p.3, l. 5-6), it turns out that he is “too self-confident” (p. 5, l. 21).

Fun fact:

If you want to use unappropriate words in a factual text, you can use “the power of quotations”.
Example:
In Sara´s opinion Danny has a “humiliating” car (p. 15, l. 24).

Advertisements

Language tips

language

Comma rules

The comma rules in English are much simpler than in German. However, that makes them difficult for us because we have to remember the differences. Here is a typical mistake:

German: Comma before a sentence with “dass” / Englisch: no comma before “that”.

Example:

Prof. Smith says that her research gives us the definitive answer.
Prof. Smith says her research gives us the definitive answer.

It would be wrong to write:

Prof. Smith says, that her research gives us the definitive answer.
Prof. Smith says, her research gives us the definitive answer.”

Plural

y → ies

democracy  → democracies

Vocabulary

“hardly” is mostly used in the meaning of “barely”. It can, however, also mean “harshly”. But it is rarely used like that. Typical examples for sentences with “hardly” are:

  1. It hardly matters what I think.

  2. The changes in service have hardly been noticed.

  3. There are hardly any new features in this software.

  4. Hardly anyone showed up for the meeting.

  5. Hardly a day goes by when I don’t think about you.

  6. This is hardly a new idea for a movie.

  7. Is this a new idea for a movie? Hardly! I’ve seen dozens of movies just like it.

source: https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/hardly